• Alternating Current Press Authors •




Allison Boyd Justus
Allison Boyd Justus’ poetry has appeared in Penwood Review, Nibble, Eunoia Review, Madcap Review, Quail Bell, Calliope, and Contemporary American Voices. A 2015-16 Middle Tennessee Writing Project Fellow, Allison teaches language arts and serves as the gifted education facilitator for Eagleville School.









David Leo Rice
David Leo Rice is a writer and animator from Northampton, Massachusetts, currently living in New York City. His stories have appeared in Black Clock, The Collagist, Birkensnake, Hobart, The Rumpus, The New Haven Review, Identity Theory, Nat. Brut, and elsewhere. A Room in Dodge City is his first novel. He has a B.A. in Esoteric Studies from Harvard University and can be found at raviddice.com and at @raviddice on Twitter.







Carmen Lau
Carmen Lau has had stories published in Catapult, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Fairy Tale Review, and other journals. She holds an MA in Creative Writing from UC-Davis. Her story, “Nothing Has Changed about Me,” was chosen as one of Wigleaf’s Top 50 Very Short Fictions, and her story, “Ghost,” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. The Girl Wakes is the winner of the Electric Book Award and is the author’s first book. Find her at her website and at @artemisathene on Twitter.







 
Eric Shonkwiler
Eric Shonkwiler has had writing appear in Los Angeles Review of Books, The Millions, Fiddleblack, [PANK] Magazine, Midwestern Gothic, and elsewhere. He was born and raised in Ohio, received his MFA from University of California Riverside as a Chancellor’s Distinguished Fellow, was selected as a New River Gorge Winter Writer-in-Residence in West Virginia, and has lived and worked in every contiguous U.S. time zone. His debut novel, Above All Men (MG Press, 2014), won the Coil Book Award for Best Book in the Independent Press, was chosen as a Midwest Connections Pick by the Midwest Independent Booksellers Association, and was included as a Best Book of the Year selection on multiple lists, including The Next Best Book Club’s and Chicago Book Review’s. His second novel, 8th Street Power & Light, was released by MG Press in October 2016. He is the winner of the Luminaire Award for Best Prose, was a finalist in the Best Small Fictions Prize and Pen 2 Paper Fiction Prize, and has formerly served as Regional Editor for LARB, a reader for [PANK], and Editor-in-Chief and Fiction Editor for Crate Magazine. Find him at ericshonkwiler.com and at @eshonkwiler on Twitter.



 
Schuler Benson
Schuler Benson’s fiction and poetry have appeared in The Idle Class, Kudzu Review, The Pinch, Little Fiction, Hobart, and elsewhere. He has been nominated for a Best of the Net Award, a Million Writers Award, and three Pushcart Prizes, and he placed second in The Fallen Sky Review’s 2013 Speculative Fiction Launch Contest. He completed his undergraduate studies at University of Arkansas and received his MA from Coastal Carolina University. The Poor Man’s Guide to an Affordable, Painless Suicide is his first book. You can find him on Twitter at @schulerbenson.

A. Jay Adler
Cynthia Anderson
Diana Andrasi
Leah Angstman


A. Jay Adler
A. Jay Adler, a New Yorker always, is Professor of English, Emeritus at LA SW College. He earned his BA, with concentrations in English lit, philosophy, and film at City University of NY, and his MA and MPhil degrees in English literature from Columbia University. Travel—by air, sea, locomotive, cable, four wheels, two wheels (motorized and muscle-driven), and by foot—remains a passion. The former poetry editor for the now-defunct West magazine, Adler writes in various genres of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry and has written for the theater and won awards for screenwriting. Academic specializations include: British and American Modernism, the novel, James Joyce studies, rhetoric and composition, argumentation, and critical thinking. Adler’s blog, the sad red earth, is one venue for his political and cultural commentary, where he pays special attention to the analysis of arguments. A 1989 interviewee for a junior fellowship in the Harvard Society of Fellows, Adler was awarded a 2002 residency grant in poetry from the Vermont Studio Center. Among several screenplays, What We Were Thinking Of has won several awards, including second prize at the 1998 Maui Writers Conference Screenwriting Competition. During his 2008-09 sabbatical year, Adler traveled the country by motor home, documenting Native American life. Adler’s article, “Aboriginal Sin,” was included in the anthology, Global Viewpoints: Indigenous Peoples, from Greenhaven Press.


Cynthia Anderson
Cynthia Anderson lives in the Mojave Desert near Joshua Tree National Park. Her poems have appeared in journals such as Askew, Dark Matter, Apercus Quarterly, Whale Road, Knot Magazine, and Origami Poems Project. She is the author of six collections: In the Mojave, Desert Dweller, Mythic Rockscapes/Barker Dam, Mythic Rockscapes/Hidden Valley, and Shared Visions I and II. She frequently collaborates with her husband, photographer Bill Dahl. Cynthia co-edited the anthology A Bird Black as the Sun: California Poets on Crows & Ravens.




Diana Andrasi
Diana Andrasi completed her studies in philology at the University of Bucharest, followed by a master’s degree and a PhD in Comparative Literature at the University of Montreal. While researching for her doctoral thesis on the subject of thought-image as a poetry device (at the beginning of the 20th century), she became interested in research projects linking contemporary poetry to urban legends, political ideologies, and global cultural development. She’s written articles, poems, and essays in both English and French. She lives in the far west of the Montreal Island with all her books and significant ones. Find her at her website.




 
Leah Angstman
Leah Angstman is an amateur historian and transplanted Michigander, unsure of what feels like home anymore. She is the recent winner of the Loudoun Library Foundation Poetry Contest and Nantucket Directory Poetry Contest and was a placed finalist in the Bevel Summers Prize for Short Fiction (Washington & Lee University), Pen 2 Paper Writing Competition (in both Poetry and Fiction categories), Saluda River Prize for Poetry, Blue Bonnet Review Poetry Contest, Baltimore Science Fiction Society Poetry Contest, and West Coast Eisteddfod Poetry Competition. She has earned three Pushcart Prize nominations and serves as Editor-in-Chief for Alternating Current Press and a reviewer for Publishers Weekly. Her poetry, fiction, and nonfiction has appeared in numerous journals, including Los Angeles Review of Books, The Rumpus, Tupelo Quarterly, Electric Literature, Midwestern Gothic, Atticus Review, The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts, and Shenandoah. You can find her at leahangstman.com and on Twitter at @leahangstman.

Charles Bane, Jr.
L. S. Bassen
Schuler Benson
Mike Bernicchi
Luis Cuauhtémoc Berriozábal
Sean Brendan-Brown
Mary Buchinger


Charles Bane, Jr.
Charles Bane, Jr., is the author of several collections of poetry, including the recent The Ends Of The Earth: Collected Poems (Transcendent Zero Press, 2015), as well as I Meet Geronimo and Other Stories (Avignon Press, 2015) and Three Seasons: Writing Donald Hall (Collection of the Houghton Library, Harvard University). He created and contributes to The Meaning Of Poetry Series for The Gutenberg Project. You can find him at charlesbanejr.com.





L. S. Bassen
L. S. Bassen lives in Lincoln, Rhode Island, and is a 2011 Finalist for the Flannery O’Connor Short Fiction Award; 2009 winner of the Atlantic Pacific Press Drama Prize; Fiction Editor at Prick of the Spindle; poetry and fiction reviewer for Horse Less Press, Small Beer Press, The Rumpus, Drexel University’s Press 1, The Brooklyner, Big Wonderful Press, Melusine, NewPages, and Galatea Resurrects; Literary Life blogger at Sobriquet Magazine; and reader for Electric Literature. She has had both poetry and fiction published in many literature journals, including Kenyon Review, American Scholar, Minnetonka, and Persimmontree, and is a prize-winning, produced, and published playwright (Samuel French, ATA in NYC, OH, NC), and commissioned co-author of a WWII memoir by the Scottish bride of Baron Kawasaki. Find her at lsbassen.com.


 
Schuler Benson
Schuler Benson’s fiction and poetry have appeared in The Idle Class, Kudzu Review, The Pinch, Little Fiction, Hobart, and elsewhere. He has been nominated for a Best of the Net Award, a Million Writers Award, and three Pushcart Prizes, and he placed second in The Fallen Sky Review’s 2013 Speculative Fiction Launch Contest. He completed his undergraduate studies at University of Arkansas and received his MA from Coastal Carolina University. The Poor Man’s Guide to an Affordable, Painless Suicide is his first book. You can find him on Twitter at @schulerbenson.



Mike Bernicchi
Mike Bernicchi is an American poet, curator, and teacher living and working between Southwest Florida and Brooklyn, New York. His works, most recently appearing in ELKE, Apeiron Review, and War, Literature & the Arts, focus on the degradation of memory through time. Bernicchi’s poems attempt to reconcile the fragility of human memory through the manipulation of traumatic events. He now enjoys teaching Literature at an alternative high school in Southwest Florida, where his students say his class is “dumb flame.” Read some of Michael’s work here, and find him on Twitter at @mcbernicchi.



Luis Cuauhtémoc Berriozábal
Luis Cuauhtémoc Berriozábal lives in West Covina, California and works in the mental health field in Los Angeles. He was born in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. His first book of poems, Raw Materials, was published by Pygmy Forest Press, and Kendra Steiner Editions will publish his next chapbook. His poetry has appeared in English and Spanish in many print and online journals.







 
Sean Brendan-Brown
Sean Brendan-Brown is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and currently resides in Olympia, Washington. A medically-retired Marine, he is the author of three poetry chapbooks (Everything Repeated Many Times, King of Wounds, West Is a Golden Paradise), a poetry collection (No Stopping Any Time), a fiction chapbook (Monarch of Hatred), and a short story collection (Brother Dionysus). He has published with The Notre Dame Review, Wisconsin Review, Indiana Review, Texas Review, Poetry East, Southampton Review, Common Ground Review, and The University of Iowa Press anthologies American Diaspora and Like Thunder. He is the recipient of a 1997 NEA Poetry Fellowship and a 2010 NEA Fiction Fellowship.


Mary Buchinger
Mary Buchinger is the author of Aerialist (Gold Wake Press, 2015; shortlisted for the May Swenson Poetry Award, the OSU Press/The Journal Wheeler Prize, and the Perugia Press Prize) and Roomful of Sparrows (Finishing Line Press, 2008). Her poems have appeared in AGNI, Booth, Border Crossing, Caesura, Cortland Review, DIAGRAM, Existere (Canada), Fifth Wednesday, New Madrid, Nimrod, PANK, SAND (Germany), Salamander, Silk Road Review, Slice Magazine, The Massachusetts Review, Versal (The Netherlands), and elsewhere. She was invited to read at the Library of Congress, received the Daniel Varoujan and the Firman Houghton Awards from the New England Poetry Club, and has been nominated multiple times for the Pushcart Prize. Originally from rural Michigan, Buchinger served in the Peace Corps in Ecuador and holds a doctorate in Applied Linguistics from Boston University. She is Associate Professor of English and Communication Studies at MCPHS University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Harry Calhoun
R. Joseph Capet
Jared A. Carnie
Paula Cary
Alan Catlin
CEE
Christina Elaine Collins
Jesseca Cornelson


Harry Calhoun
Harry Calhoun passed away on October 31, 2015. Before that, Harry survived three broken ribs and three marriages. He endured countless jobs, wrote a ton of articles and other works, and had a few dozen books and chapbooks of poetry published. His books and chapbooks include I knew Bukowski like you knew a rare leaf; The Black Dog and the Road; Something Real; Near daybreak, with a nod to Frost; Retreating Aggressively into the Dark; The Insomnia Poems; Maintenance and Death; Retro; How Love Conquers the World; and Failure Is Unimportant. His career has included Pushcart Prize nominations, a Sundress Best of the Net nomination, and publications in Lily, Abbey, Orange Room Review, Gutter Eloquence, Faircloth Review, Thunder Sandwich, and others. Harry lived in Raleigh with his wife, Trina, and his dogs, Hamlet and Harriet.


R. Joseph Capet
R. Joseph Capet is a poet and theologian living in Monmouth, Oregon, whose work in multiple languages has appeared in journals and magazines as diverse as decomP, The Montreal Review, American Journal of Biblical Theology, and Sennaciulo. He currently lays up treasures on Earth teaching English to students in Latin America and treasures in heaven teaching Esperanto to anyone who will learn, while serving as poetry editor for P. Q. Leer.






Jared A. Carnie
Jared A. Carnie recently left the Outer Hebrides. He can be found at jaredacarnie.com.











Paula Cary
Paula Cary is a poet, living with a wannabe pirate in Green Cove Springs, Florida. Her chapbooks include Agapornis Swinderniana (Dancing Girl Press, 2012) and Sister, Blood and Bone (Blood Pudding Press, 2013). She reviews other writers at her blog, Poet Hound, and she hopes to spread the love of poetry through her work online and through her sidewalk-chalk art on her driveway.







 
Alan Catlin
Alan Catlin lives in Schenectady, New York, and has been writing and publishing since the 70s. Among his many publications are some sixty chapbooks and full-length books of poetry and prose. His most recent full-length book of poetry is Alien Nation. He is the poetry editor of Misfit Magazine.






 
CEE
CEE is a failed short story writer, failed novelist, and failed playwright. In the early 2000s, he developed Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, forcing him, by 2007, to fall back to the shorthand of poetry. Over 600 of his poems have since seen or will see some form of media. He has been printed in such diverse publications as bear creek haiku, Jerry Jazz Musician, Children, Churches and Daddies, Tales of the Talisman, The Storyteller, Barbaric Yawp, The Iconoclast, Poiesis Review, and Dreams and Nightmares. His poem, “It’s An Old Story,” received a Pushcart Prize nomination in 2009. He is the author of 17 chapbooks, including 12 times 12 equals Gross, Und ihr Habt Doch Gesiegt (You Have Finally Won), I Am Not Sydney Carton, tomB Baby (with Hot Robert Toddy), and Gunther, and he has been included in the international mailers of Marymark Press.


 
Christina Elaine Collins
Christina Elaine Collins is an MFA candidate and Honors Award recipient in fiction at George Mason University. Her stories and poems have appeared in various literary periodicals and anthologies, including Jabberwock Review, Weave Magazine, and NonBinary Review. In addition to three Pushcart Prize nominations, she has received Finalist and Special Mention awards in several literary competitions such as the 2014 Katherine Paterson Prize at Hunger Mountain, the Heavy Feather Review 2013 Featured Fiction Chapbook Contest, and the Gambling the Aisle 2013 Chapbook Competition. She has been a writer-in-residence at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, as well as the Art Commune program in Armenia.


Jesseca Cornelson
Jesseca Cornelson, an associate professor of English at Alabama State University, is currently working on a book-length collection of documentary poems based on Alabama history. Her critical work appears in The Great Recession in Fiction, Film, and Television: Twenty-First Century Bust Culture. Her poetry has recently appeared in Cellpoems, Salamander, Platte Valley Review, and The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature. She keeps company with two adventure hounds and enjoys hiking and kayaking in Alabama’s stunning natural spaces. Find her at difficulthistory.wordpress.com.


Justin Lawrence Daugherty
K. M. Dersley
Doug Draime
Aleathia Drehmer


Justin Lawrence Daugherty
Justin Lawrence Daugherty lives in Atlanta and is the Co-Publisher of Jellyfish Highway Press.











K. M. Dersley
K. M. Dersley lives in Framlingham, Suffolk, England, and has had poems and articles published in Poetry Review, London Magazine, The Rialto, Zygote in My Coffee, Thunder Sandwich, Laura Hird, Word Riot, and others. He has performed his work in London, Cambridge, Colchester, Chelmsford, and at the Wessex Festival and the Dulwich Festival. His books include Sketches by Derz, Between the Alleyways at the World’s Fair, and Management Gold Not Me. Find him on Facebook.






Doug Draime
Doug Draime passed away on February 17, 2015. Before his death, he emerged as a poet, short-story writer, and playwright in the literary ‘underground’ in Los Angeles in the late 1960s. His latest book was More Than the Alley, a full-length poetry collection from Interior Noise Press. Also available are three chapbooks: Los Angeles Terminal: Poems 1971-1980 (Covert Press), Rock ‘n’ Roll Jizz (Alternating Current), and an online chap, Speed of Light (Right Hand Pointing). Draime lived in Medford, Orgeon, and was awarded PEN grants in 1987, 1991, and 1992. During the last few years before his death, he had been nominated for several Pushcart Prizes.




Aleathia Drehmer
Aleathia Drehmer lives in Painted Post, New York, and is the former editor of the flash-fiction website, In Between Altered States, and the art editor for the online journal, Regardless of Authority. In a previous life, she produced a print zine called Durable Goods and edited for Full of Crow Press and Zygote in My Coffee. Her work has been published extensively in the small press, both online and in print. Her most recent poetry collection, You Find Me Everywhere, is available from Alternating Current. Aleathia’s future is pointed toward the deep country where she hopes to see the world for what it is and put it down in words. Find her at her website.


Michael Estabrook
Gary Every


Michael Estabrook
Michael Estabrook lives in Acton, Massachusetts, and is finally free, after 40 years of working for “The Man” and sometimes “The Woman.” No more useless meetings under fluorescent lights in stuffy, windowless rooms. He can concentrate instead on making better poems and on pursuing his other interests, including: history, art, music, theater, opera, and his wife, who is still the most beautiful woman he has ever known. Find him on Facebook.






Gary Every
Gary Every lives in Cottonwood, Arizona, and is the author of nine books, including Shadow of the Ohshad, a compilation of the best of his award-winning newspaper columns concerning Southwestern history, folklore, Native Americans, and the environment. His science fiction novella, The Saint and the Robot, regarding medieval legend he uncovered about Thomas Aquinas, is also available from Amazon. Find him at garyevery.com.




Jason Fisk


Jason Fisk
Jason Fisk is a husband, a father of two, and a teacher, living in the suburbs of Chicago. He is the author of a collection of short stories, Hank and Jules; a collection of micro-fiction published by Chicago Center for Literature and Photography, Salt Creek Anthology; a collection of poetry published by Six Gallery Press, the fierce crackle of fragile wings; and two poetry chapbooks published by Alternating Current, The Sagging: Spirits & Skin and Decay. Find him at jasonfisk.com.




Lawrence Gladeview
Nathan Graziano
Andrei Guruianu


Lawrence Gladeview
Lawrence Gladeview is a barroom raconteur and the author of two poetry collections. His writing has been published in magazines around the world, and his books are stocked on the shelves of independent bookstores and university libraries. Lawrence lives and writes in Denver, Colorado with his wife, Rebecca. Find him at lawrencegladeview.com.








Nathan Graziano
Nathan Graziano is a high school teacher with an MFA in fiction writing from The University of New Hampshire. He is the author of three collections of poetry, Not So Profound (Green Bean Press, 2003), Teaching Metaphors (Sunnyoutside, 2007), and After the Honeymoon (Sunnyoutside, 2009); two collections of short prose, Frostbite (GBP, 2002) and Hangover Breakfasts (Bottle of Smoke Press, 2012); and several chapbooks of fiction and poetry. His work has appeared in numerous literary publications and websites, such as Word Riot, The Hawaii Review, The Good Men Project, Night Train, Rattle, and Nerve Cowboy. His short story, “Fishbone,” was a finalist for The Norman Mailer Award in 2011, and he has a trophy to prove it. In his spare time, he enjoys writing bios about himself in third person that make it seem like any of this crap matters. Find him at nathangraziano.com.


Andrei Guruianu
Andrei Guruianu was born in 1979 in Bucharest, Romania. He is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry and prose, and currently teaches in the Expository Writing Program at New York University. You can find him at his website.






Ed Hamilton
George Held
Anthony G. Herles
Kevin M. Hibshman
Justin Hyde


Ed Hamilton
Ed Hamilton lives in New York City, and is the author of Legends of the Chelsea Hotel: Living with the Artists and Outlaws of New York’s Rebel Mecca (Da Capo, 2007) and the short story collection, The Chintz Age: Tales of Love and Loss for a New New York (Červená Barva Press, 2015). His fiction has appeared in various journals, including Limestone Journal, The Journal of Kentucky Studies, River Walk Journal, Exquisite Corpse, Modern Drunkard, Lumpen, Omphalos, Bohemia, Poetic Story: An Anthology, and in translation in Czechoslovakia’s Host. His nonfiction has appeared in Experienced: Rock Music Tales of Fact and Fiction (Vagabondage Press LLC, 2011), as well as in Chelsea Now, The Villager, The Huffington Post, and other local NYC newspapers.


George Held
George Held is a seven-time Pushcart Prize nominee, a three-year Fulbright lecturer in Czechoslovakia, and a teacher of English at Queens College for 37 years. His poems, short stories, book reviews, and translations have appeared in such places as Circumference, Commonweal, Confrontation, and The Notre Dame Review, and on Garrison Keillor’s The Writer’s Almanac, as well as in over two dozen anthologies. Held’s 17 poetry collections include Beyond Renewal, After Shakespeare: Selected Sonnets, and Neighbors, Books 1 and 2: animal poems for children, illustrated by Joung Un Kim. George lives in Greenwich Village, with his wife, Cheryl. Find him at georgeheld.blogspot.com.



Anthony G. Herles
Anthony G. Herles is a retired New York State English teacher. He taught English at the high school level for 30 years and also taught English as an adjunct lecturer for 20 years at Dutchess Community College in Poughkeepsie. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Happy, PEN Works, Words of Wisdom, New Authors Journal, The Hartford Courant, The Poetry Explosion Newsletter (PEN), Barbaric Yawp, New England Writers Network (NEWN), The Blind Man’s Rainbow, Poiesis Review, Timber Creek Review, River Poets Journal, The Storyteller, Jaw Magazine, The Writer’s Post Journal, The Lyric, and others. Four chapbooks are available from Alternating Current: Fourteen Singles, Poughkeepsie Icehouse, Men Stuff, and Bob Barker Died.


Kevin M. Hibshman
Kevin M. Hibshman was born in Philadelphia on the now-defunct Naval Base; his father was serving as a medic there. The family moved two years later to Lititz, Pennsylvania, where he spent the remainder of his childhood. Life in a sequestered village was alienating, and Kevin sought refuge in music and poetry. His first influences included rock poets, Lou Reed, Jim Morrison, and Patti Smith. Later, he fell under the spell of the Beats and began to take writing seriously. Kevin performed in a few rock bands and music projects during the late 80s/early 90s. He has edited his own poetry magazine, Fearless, for nearly twenty years, as it transformed from print zine to eZine. Over the past two decades, Kevin has released many chapbooks and broadsides, and his poems, reviews, and collages have been published in numerous magazines worldwide. His most recent chapbook, Incessant Shining, was published by Alternating Current in 2011. Kevin resides in Pennsylvania with his artist partner, William, and his cat, Siouxsie. Find him on Facebook.


Justin Hyde
Justin Hyde lives in Des Moines, Iowa, and works in a women’s halfway house.










Merilyn Jackson
Luther Jett
Allison Boyd Justus


Merilyn Jackson
Merilyn Jackson attended Temple University, got married, had two kids, divorced, remarried, owned two cheese/gourmet food shops, divorced, married the love of her life, and since 1996, has been The Philadelphia Inquirer’s principal dance critic. She writes for many publications on dance, theater, and literature, especially Eastern European fiction, politics, and poetry—altogether more than 800 published works because she’s never stopped writing. The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts awarded her food-driven novel-in-progress, O Solitary Host, a Literature Fellowship. A chapter of the novel appeared in The Massachusetts Review in the ‘Food Matters’ fall 2004 issue. In 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University. Her poetry has been published, most recently, in Exquisite Corpse, The Rusty Nail, and Broad Street Review. In 2012, she attended poetry workshops at Colgate University and Sarah Lawrence College, working with poets Peter Balakian and Tom Lux, respectively. Find her work at primeglib.com.


Luther Jett
Luther Jett lives in Washington Grove, Maryland, and has recently completed his first novel. His poetry has been published in numerous journals, including The GW Review, ABRAXAS, Beltway, Innisfree, and Main Street Rag. His poetry performance piece, “Flying to America,” debuted at the 2009 Capital Fringe Festival in Washington D.C. He was also a winner in the 2011 Moving Words Poetry Competition in Arlington, Virginia. Find him at lutherjett.com.






Allison Boyd Justus
Allison Boyd Justus’ poetry has appeared in Penwood Review, Nibble, Eunoia Review, Madcap Review, Quail Bell, Calliope, and Contemporary American Voices. A 2015-16 Middle Tennessee Writing Project Fellow, Allison teaches language arts and serves as the gifted education facilitator for Eagleville School.






Patrick Kindig
Noel King
Miodrag Kojadinović


Patrick Kindig
Patrick Kindig recently graduated from Michigan State University, where he studied German and English with a concentration in creative writing. His poetry and fiction have been published in or are forthcoming in Prairie Margins, The Offbeat, and The Red Cedar Review.









Noel King
Noel King was born in and lives in Tralee, Ireland. His poems, haiku, short stories, reviews, and articles have appeared in magazines and journals in thirty-seven countries. His poetry collections are published by Salmon Poetry: Prophesying the Past (2010), The Stern Wave (2013), and Sons. He has edited more than fifty books of work by others. Anthology publications include The Second Genesis: An Anthology of Contemporary World Poetry (A.R.A.W., India, 2014).





Miodrag Kojadinović
Miodrag Kojadinović is a Canadian-Serbian poet, prose writer, journalist, translator, interpreter, and photographer. He has undergraduate degrees from Serbia and Canada, postgraduate ones from Serbia, the U.S., the Netherlands, and Hungary, and has worked at universities/colleges in Norway, Mainland China, the Netherlands, Serbia, and Macau. His writing, in a wide range of genres, has been published in thirteen languages in Canada, Serbia, the U.S., France, Russia, China, England, Holland, Spain, Slovenia, India, Macau, Scotland, Croatia, Australia, Germany, Israel, Austria, and Montenegro. He has also appeared in three documentaries (one of which was about himself as a globetrotter seeking a place under the Sun). Find him on Wikipedia.

Phillip Larrea
Carmen Lau
Brian Le Lay
Stephanie Liden
Lyn Lifshin
Helen Losse


Phillip Larrea
Phillip Larrea lives in Sacramento, California, and has been widely published in the U.S., Canada, Ireland, and Europe. His chapbook, Our Patch (Writing Knights Press), was released January 2013. Phillip’s full-length poetry collection, We the People (Cold River Press), was released in April 2013.









Carmen Lau
Carmen Lau has had stories published in Catapult, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Fairy Tale Review, and other journals. She holds an MA in Creative Writing from UC-Davis. Her story, “Nothing Has Changed about Me,” was chosen as one of Wigleaf’s Top 50 Very Short Fictions, and her story, “Ghost,” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. The Girl Wakes is the winner of the Electric Book Award and is the author’s first book. Find her at her website and at @artemisathene on Twitter.






Brian Le Lay
Brian Le Lay is a poet and a sociology student in Boston, Massachusetts. His poems have recently appeared in The Orange Room Review, Word Riot, and Gutter Eloquence. Find him at his website.










Stephanie Liden
Stephanie Liden was born and raised in Northern Minnesota. She received her B.A. in journalism and recently her M.A. in English from the University of North Dakota, where she completed her thesis-style portfolio, entitled “Americanization and Assimilation,” in which she presents a critique of popular immigration narratives in American Literature. She contributed as a reader for North Dakota Quarterly and the student-run literary magazine, Floodwall. Liden is currently living in a small Minnesota farming community and continues to write.




 
Lyn Lifshin
Lyn Lifshin lives in Vienna, Virginia, and has written more than 125 books and edited four anthologies of women writers. Her poems have appeared in numerous poetry and literary magazines in the U.S., and she has given more than 700 readings. Lyn has appeared at Dartmouth, Skidmore, Cornell University, Shakespeare Library, Whitney Museum, and Huntington Library, and has been Poet-in-Residence at the University of Rochester, Antioch, and Colorado Mountain College. She is the winner of numerous awards, including the Jack Kerouac Award for her book, Kiss the Skin Off. She is also the author of Another Woman Who Looks Like Me (Black Sparrow Press), the prize-winning The Licorice Daughter: My Year with Ruffian (Texas Review Press), Before It’s Light (Black Sparrow), Cold Comfort (Black Sparrow), Persephone (Red Hen), A Girl Goes into the Woods (NYQ Books), and many more. Find her at lynlifshin.com.


Helen Losse
Helen Losse lives in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and is the author of three full-length poetry books, Facing a Lonely West and Seriously Dangerous (Main Street Rag), and Better with Friends (Rank Stranger Press), and three chapbooks. A former English teacher, Helen has been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize and three times for a Best of the Net award, one time of which she was a finalist. She was Poetry Editor for The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature and is now its Poetry Editor Emeritus. Her poems have been anthologized in In the Arms of Words: Poems for Disaster Relief; Washing the Color of Water Golden: A Hurricane Katrina Anthology; and Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont. She holds a BSE from Missouri Southern State University and an MALS from Wake Forest, where she wrote her thesis on Martin Luther King, Jr. Find her at helenl.wordpress.com.

Angela Consolo Mankiewicz
Hosho McCreesh
Frankie Metro
Heather K. Michon
Yasmin Khan Murgai


Angela Consolo Mankiewicz
Angela Consolo Mankiewicz lives in Los Angeles, California, and has published four chapbooks; the most recent are An Eye, published by Pecan Grove Press, and As If, Published by Little Red Books–Lummox. Angela’s publications include: Poets/Artists, Full of Crow, Long Poem Magazine (UK), PRESA, Montserrat, Re)Verb, Sketchbook, Seldom Nocturne, Istanbul Literary Review, Arsenic Lobster, Temple/Tsunami, Butcher Block, Slipstream, Chiron Review, The Hawaii Review, Cerberus, Karamu, Lynx Eye, Pemmican, Blind Man’s Rainbow, and ArtWord. Other recognitions include two Pushcart Prize nominations and 1st and Grand Prizes from Trellis Magazine, JerseyWorks, and Amelia. Her children’s stories, The Grummel Book, have been reissued on CD by Shoofly; and Laura Hanson, a novella, was serialized by ESC! Magazine. She has also been the Contributing Editor and Regional Editor, respectively, for the small (now defunct) journals, Mushroom Dreams and The New Press Quarterly. Her chamber opera, One Day Less, music by D. Javelosa, was performed at the Broad 2nd Space in Santa Monica, California. Find her at poetacmank.blogspot.com.


Hosho McCreesh
Hosho McCreesh is currently writing and painting in the gypsum and caliche badlands of the American Southwest. He has work appearing widely in print, audio, and online. His books are available from Bottle of Smoke Press, Mary Celeste Press, Sunnyoutside, Orange Alert Press, and Alternating Current; broadsides are available from 10pt Press; art prints are available at society6.com. Find him at hoshomccreesh.com.







Frankie Metro
Frankie Metro is one-third of the editorial team at Kleft Jaw Press and writes music, book, and event reviews for Unlikely Stories Episode: IV. He lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and has been published in numerous online and print anthologies and journals. His first poetry chapbook, The Anarchist’s Blac Book of Poetry, was published by Crisis Chronicles Press.







Heather K. Michon
Heather K. Michon is an essayist and historian living in the green hills of Central Virginia. Her work has appeared in Salon, The Washington Post, and other publications. Her essay, “The Night Watch: Creativity in the Dim,” developed out of new research on the effect of dim light on creativity, but turned into a short historical survey on just how much human artistry has been born and nurtured, mushroom-like, in the dark. Find her at her website.






Yasmin Khan Murgai
Yasmin Khan Murgai is an English writer of Irish and Pakistani heritage. Her writing is inspired by her work as a BBC journalist, her travels, and family history. Her stories have been published in collections from Kind of Hurricane Press, Dirty Chai Magazine, and National Flash Fiction Day. You can find her on Twitter at @msyasminkhan.






Normal


Normal
With presently 550–600 pieces published between 1992 and 2015 (without the Internet), Normal remains “one of the last American primitives” [self-described] in the underground press. His most recent book, I See Hunger’s Children: Selected Poems 1962–2012, was published by Lummox Press in 2012.





James O’Brien
Shauna Osborn


James O’Brien
James O’Brien lives in New York City, and holds a PhD in Editorial Studies from the Editorial Institute at Boston University, where he researched and edited Bob Dylan’s other-than-song writings. He is engaged in a bibliography for Oxford University Press, covering writings about the filmmaker John Cassavetes. His journalism, short stories, and poetry are published in numerous journals and magazines. Find him at jamesobrien.cc.






Shauna Osborn
Shauna Osborn is a Comanche/German mestiza who works as an instructor, wordsmith, and community organizer in Albuquerque. She received her Master of Fine Arts from New Mexico State University in 2005. Shauna has won various awards for her academic research, photography, and poetry. Recently, she received a National Poetry Award from the New York Public Library. Find her at her website.





Diane Payne
Robert L. Penick
Pearl Pirie
David S. Pointer
D. A. Pratt


Diane Payne
Diane Payne’s most recent publications include: Map Literary Review, Watershed Review, Tishman Review, Whiskey Island, Kudzu House Quarterly, Superstition Review, Burrow Press, Dime Show Review, Lime Hawk, and Cheat River Review. She has work forthcoming in The Offing, Elke: A little Journal, Souvenir Literary Journal, and Outpost 19. Diane is the author of Burning Tulips (Red Hen Press) and is the MFA Director at University of Arkansas at Monticello.





Robert L. Penick
Robert L. Penick has had poetry, prose, and essays appear in over 100 literary magazines, including The Hudson Review, The North American Review, and Quiddity. He works with the mentally ill in Louisville, Kentucky. Find him on Facebook.









Pearl Pirie
Pearl Pirie is a food columnist, a book reviewer, and the author of three full-length collections of poetry: the pet radish, shrunken (BookThug, 2015), been shed bore (2010), and Thirsts (2011), the latter of which won the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry. She lives in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and has a micropress called phafours. Find her at pearlpirie.com.







 
David S. Pointer
David S. Pointer is an American political poet living in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. In Spring 2012, he was asked to become an advisory panel member at Writing For Peace. This organization teaches world peace writing to young people ages 13-19. David’s two most recent political poetry books are The Psychobilly Princess and Sundrenched Nanosilver. His recent anthology publications include: Serial Killers 2, Poe-It!, Poiesis Review, and elsewhere. Find him on Facebook.




D. A. Pratt
D. A. Pratt lives in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, and has short articles on Charles Bukowski and Henry Miller published, as well as a number of other poems, many of which have been composed at Earl’s South, where Pratt can sometimes be found with a pad of paper.







Misti Rainwater-Lites
David Leo Rice
Charles P. Ries
Christopher Robbins
Robert James Russell


Misti Rainwater-Lites
Misti Rainwater-Lites is the author of several collections of poetry and fiction, most recently: Bullshit Rodeo, available from Epic Rites Press. She resides in San Antonio, and you can find her at her website.










David Leo Rice
David Leo Rice is a writer and animator from Northampton, Massachusetts, currently living in New York City. His stories have appeared in Black Clock, The Collagist, Birkensnake, Hobart, The Rumpus, The New Haven Review, Identity Theory, Nat. Brut, and elsewhere. A Room in Dodge City is his first novel. He has a B.A. in Esoteric Studies from Harvard University and can be found at raviddice.com and at @raviddice on Twitter.






 
Charles P. Ries
Charles P. Ries’ narrative poems, short stories, interviews, and poetry reviews have appeared in over two hundred print and electronic publications. He has received four Pushcart Prize nominations for his writing and is the author of six books of poetry. He was awarded the Wisconsin Regional Writers Association Jade Ring Award for humorous poetry and is the former poetry editor of Word Riot and ESC!. Ries is also the author of The Fathers We Find, a somewhat-fictionalized memoir of his growing up on a mink farm in Southeastern Wisconsin. His work is archived in the Charles P. Ries Collection at Marquette University. A citizen philosopher, he lived in London and North Africa after college, where he studied the mystical teachings of Islam known as Sufism. In 1989, he worked with the Dalai Lama on a program that brought American religious- and psycho-therapists together for a weeklong dialogue. He has done extensive work with men’s groups and worked with a Jungian psychotherapist for over five years, during which time he learned to find meanings in small things. He is also a founding member of the Lake Shore Surf Club, the oldest freshwater surfing club on the Great Lakes.


Christopher Robbins
Christopher Robbins grew up in the state of ecstasy. He watched a lot of Voltron and Buster Keaton. His favorite Stooge is Curly Joe. Find him on Twitter.











Robert James Russell
Robert James Russell is a Pushcart Prize-nominated author and the co-founding editor of the literary journal, Midwestern Gothic. His work has appeared in Pithead Chapel, Crime Factory, WhiskeyPaper, Joyland, Thunderclap! Magazine, The Collagist, and Gris-Gris, among others. His first novel, Sea of Trees, is available from Winter Goose Publishing. Find him at robertjamesrussell.com.





Constance Sayers
Janette Schafer
Angie Jeffreys Schomp
Robert Schuler
Claudia Serea
Neil Serven
Denis Sheehan
Eric Shonkwiler
Jon Sindell
Vic Sizemore
Kirby Anne Snell
Kaye Spivey
Alex Stolis
Jane Stuart


Constance Sayers
Constance Sayers received her master of arts in English from George Mason University and graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts in writing from the University of Pittsburgh. She attended The Bread Loaf Writers Conference where she studied with Charles Baxter and Lauren Groff. Her short stories have appeared in Souvenir and Amazing Graces: Yet Another Collection of Fiction by Washington Area Women. A media executive at Atlantic Media (publisher of The Atlantic), she’s twice been named one of the “Top 100 Media People in America” by Folio and was included in their list of “Top Women in Media.” She has completed a rural noir novel, Rustic Mournings.


Janette Schafer
Janette Schafer is a classically trained opera singer who has performed as a soloist for opera companies, theater houses, universities, and orchestras throughout the United States and Europe. As a writer, her poems, nonfiction articles, and stories have appeared in over 30 literary journals, magazines, and newspapers. A collection of her poetry, Other Names and Places, was published in 2004. Her play, Mad Virginia, on the suicide of Virginia Woolf, recently debuted in Pittsburgh, produced by OM Productions. Janette is also Founder and Artist Director of aMUSEd artist cooperative. Lastly, she sings with the most fun groups of people you could hope to meet, in two local Pittsburgh garage bands: One O’Clock Monday and The Middle Ages. She lives in McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania, with her husband and cats. Find her at operajan.xanga.com.


 
Angie Jeffreys Schomp
Angie Jeffreys Schomp lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, and has been writing poetry since the age of six. She studied English Literature and Creative Writing at Hollins University. She also studied linguistics at University College Cork, Cork, Ireland, for one lucky semester. Angie now cares for her father’s health full time. Since college, she has worked for Open Hand Publishing, LLC, tended the flocks at a public school after-school care program, privately nannied for a couple years, and chosen to spend most of her spare time gardening and hanging with her dog. Strangely, this timeline lends itself to lots of the good, bad, sometimes the ugly, too, in writing.


Robert Schuler
Robert Schuler is an Emeritus Professor of English, retired after 45 years of teaching. He is now studying flowers, birds, the wind, history, life. And continuing to write. His most recent book of poems, The Book of Jeweled Visions, is available from MWPH Books. He lives in Menomonie, Wisconsin, and is now at work on several more collections of poems. Find him on Poets & Writers.







Claudia Serea
Claudia Serea is a Romanian-born poet who immigrated to the U.S. in 1995. Her poems and translations have appeared in 5 a.m., Meridian, Harpur Palate, Word Riot, The Red Wheelbarrow, Apple Valley Review, and many others. She was nominated two times for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. She is the author of Angels & Beasts (Phoenicia Publishing, Canada, 2012), A Dirt Road Hangs from the Sky (8th House Publishing, Canada), and the chapbooks: The System (Cold Hub Press, New Zealand, 2012), With the Strike of a Match (White Knuckles Press, 2011), and Eternity’s Orthography (Finishing Line Press, 2007). She co-edited and co-translated The Vanishing Point That Whistles: An Anthology of Contemporary Romanian Poetry (Talisman Publishing, 2011), and translated from the Romanian: Adina Dabija’s Beautybeast (Northshore Press, 2012).


Neil Serven
Neil Serven lives and works as a dictionary editor in Western Massachusetts. His stories have appeared in Washington Square, Beloit Fiction Journal, Ayris, Cobalt, Atticus Review, and elsewhere. Find him at neilserven.com.










Denis Sheehan
Denis Sheehan lives in Boston, Massachusetts, and has been the editor/publisher of Askew Reviews zine for about 15 years … and counting. His junk has appeared in Chiron Review, Gonzo Parenting, Gloom Cupboard, Astoria, Jersey Beat, In Between Altered States, AVN Magazine, and others, aside from his mother’s fridge. He is the author of A Nobody’s Nothings, The Longsberry Letters, and Track Wreckard 1-14. Unfortunately, more books are on the way. Find him at boneprint.com.






 
Eric Shonkwiler
Eric Shonkwiler has had writing appear in Los Angeles Review of Books, The Millions, Fiddleblack, [PANK] Magazine, Midwestern Gothic, and elsewhere. He was born and raised in Ohio, received his MFA from University of California Riverside as a Chancellor’s Distinguished Fellow, was selected as a New River Gorge Winter Writer-in-Residence in West Virginia, and has lived and worked in every contiguous U.S. time zone. His debut novel, Above All Men (MG Press, 2014), won the Coil Book Award for Best Book in the Independent Press, was chosen as a Midwest Connections Pick by the Midwest Independent Booksellers Association, and was included as a Best Book of the Year selection on multiple lists, including The Next Best Book Club’s and Chicago Book Review’s. His second novel, 8th Street Power & Light, was released by MG Press in October 2016. He is the winner of the Luminaire Award for Best Prose, was a finalist in the Best Small Fictions Prize and Pen 2 Paper Fiction Prize, and has formerly served as Regional Editor for LARB, a reader for [PANK], and Editor-in-Chief and Fiction Editor for Crate Magazine. Find him at ericshonkwiler.com and at @eshonkwiler on Twitter.


Jon Sindell
Jon Sindell’s short fiction has appeared in several dozen publications, among them Hobart, Pithead Chapel, Word Riot, Connotation Press, MadHat Lit, New South, Mojave River Review, The Good Men Project, Prick of the Spindle, and Weave. He is the author of the books Family Happiness and The Roadkill Collection. A human, he earns his bread as a humanities tutor and professional writing coach. He curates the Rolling Writers reading series in San Francisco and practiced law once’t.





Vic Sizemore
Vic Sizemore’s short fiction and nonfiction are published or forthcoming in StoryQuarterly, Southern Humanities Review, storySouth, Connecticut Review, Blue Mesa Review, Sou’wester, PANK Magazine, Silk Road Review, Atticus Review, Reed Magazine, Superstition Review, Entropy, Eclectica, Ghost Town, and elsewhere. Excerpts from his short story cycle, Eternity Rowboat, are published or forthcoming in Connecticut Review, Portland Review, Drunken Boat, Prick of the Spindle, Burrow Press Review, Pithead Chapel, and Letters. Sizemore’s fiction has won the New Millennium Writings Award, and been nominated for Best American Nonrequired Reading and two Pushcart Prizes. You can find Vic at his website.


Kirby Anne Snell
Kirby Anne Snell has had poems published in Crab Orchard Review, Flyway, Measure, and Think Journal. She received her MFA in Poetry from the University of North Carolina–Wilmington. A Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Micronesia, 2009-2011), Kirby currently lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and works as an editor. Find her on Twitter.







Kaye Spivey
Kaye Spivey is a writer who lives in the Pacific Northwest with her fiancé and two cats, Pi and Mulan. Her roaming lifestyle has inspired much of her writing and helped shape her appreciation of close friends and family. She first published her poetry chapbook, An Isolated Storm, in 2015. Her writing has been previously published in several literary journals including Written River, Sterling Mag, Ghostlight, The Penwood Review, Northwest Boulevard, and For Books’ Sake. Find her at kayespivey.wordpress.com.





Alex Stolis
Alex Stolis lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and has had poems published in numerous journals. He is the author of Justice for All (Conversation Paperpress), a chapbook based on the last words of Texas Death Row inmates, and A Cabal of Angels (Red Bird Chapbooks), a collaborative chapbook with artist Susan Solomon. An e-chapbook, From an iPod found in Canal Park; Duluth, MN, was also recently released by Right Hand Pointing. He has been the recipient of five Pushcart Nominations.






Jane Stuart
Jane Stuart lives in a family home in Greenup, Kentucky, that is now in the middle of a nature preserve. Her writing interest is poetry—traditional forms (cinquain, sonnet, villanelle, haiku, tanka) and some free verse. She enjoys making bread, doing counted cross-stitch, making cross-stitch quilt tops, and observing nature.






William Taylor, Jr.
Travis Turner


William Taylor, Jr.
William Taylor, Jr., currently lives and writes in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco. His books of poetry include Words for Songs Never Written and The Hunger Season. An Age of Monsters, his first book of fiction, is available from Epic Rites Press, along with his latest book of poetry, Broken When We Got Here, and The Blood of a Tourist, a collection of new poems, is available from Sunnyoutside Press. Find him on Facebook.






Travis Turner
Travis Turner writes fiction and teaches literature at the University of Alabama. Son of the Blackbelt. Lover of good bourbon and better storytelling. Find him on Facebook.









Holly M. Wendt
Donovan White
Laura Elizabeth Woollett
Amy Wright


Holly M. Wendt
Holly M. Wendt is an Assistant Professor of English at Lebanon Valley College. Her prose and poetry have appeared in or are forthcoming from Barrelhouse, Memorious, Gulf Stream, Gray’s Sporting Journal, WhiskeyPaper, and others. She received a Robert and Charlotte Baron Fellowship for Creative and Performing Artists from the American Antiquarian Society and was a fellow at the Jentel Foundation.






Donovan White
Donovan White made a living as a carpenter while enrolled in a Creative Writing program and wrote short fiction on nights and weekends. Then, he worked as an editor and wrote nothing but headlines and captions. Now, he manages software development and writes poetry on nights and weekends and on breaks in his workday commute. Whenever he starts feeling mature, or smart, or sophisticated, sooner or later he remembers that he’s had only a few great loves in his life, and three of them were dogs. He lives in Lowell, Massachusetts, and his work has surfaced in Silenced Press, Nibble, Word Riot, Poiesis Review, and Durable Goods, among others. Find him on Facebook.



 
Laura Elizabeth Woollett
Laura Elizabeth Woollett is a Perth-born author, editor, and aspiring screenwriter, living in Melbourne, Australia. Her first novel, The Wood of Suicides, was published in 2014 by The Permanent Press, and her short story collection, The Love of a Bad Man, was published in August 2016 by Scribe Australia. Since 2012, she has been a fiction editor for Voiceworks. Find her at her website.




Amy Wright
Amy Wright is the author of two poetry collections and five chapbooks. Her work has appeared in Kenyon Review, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, DIAGRAM, Tupelo Quarterly, and Brevity. Find her online at awrightawright.com.






Paula Anne Yup


Paula Anne Yup
Paula Anne Yup has written poetry since her childhood in Arizona, and later at Occidental College; her MFA is from the Vermont College program. Her 100+ poems have appeared in anthologies, including, Feather, Fins & Fur, Earth Beneath, Sky Beyond, A Kiss Is Still a Kiss, What Book!?, and journals, including Earth’s Daughters, Off the Coast, California Quarterly, and Mid-American Review. Her first book, Making a Clean Space in the Sky, was recently published by Evening Street Press. She has lived in the Republic of the Marshall Islands for a decade and sometimes gets homesick, even in paradise.


Elizabeth Zuckerman


Elizabeth Zuckerman
Elizabeth Zuckerman has had work published in Timeless Tales Magazine, the Pink Narcissus Press anthology Rapunzel’s Daughters, and NonBinary Review. Her history-teacher parents were thrilled when she learned to enjoy battlefields and historical markers. She lives in Trenton, New Jersey, where she blogs about myths in her free time. Find her on Twitter.







This authors listing currently only includes authors with work published in journals or books from our post-2013 paperback catalog and from our online journal, The Coil. We are in the process of updating our backcatalog and converting all our pre-2013 publications to paperback and ebook. Pre-2013 chapbook authors will be added as their updated print publications become available. Authors from previous online journals will be added as their work is moved over to The Coil.